Tag Archives: journalism

Transmedia Reporting and Electronic Music

This morning I was reading an article by lecturer and professor Henry Jenkins about effective use of transmedia forms and the entertainment industry’s slugish ability in adopting the form.

‘Transmedia’ is a term that describes a media phenomenon that exists across multiple platforms and which facilitates different user experiences depending on the platform. Pokemon is one of the best examples of a transmedia concept, as identified by Jenkins. The Pokemon world is one that exists across TV series’, movies, manga, video games, card games, and etc.

The Wartortle universe is expanded by this expertly crafted fan-music.

Transmedia Journalism

As the transmedia practice tends to enrich a users interaction with subject matter and offer a user opportunities to demonstrate agency with media interaction, I believe that the practice would benefit journalism.

In fact, journalism has exists transmedia since the printing press entered popular use, when one could,perhaps, receive news from both a town crier and a local pamphlet.

In this day and age, news about an event is delivered in print, on the radio, and across the internet in the form of news outlets, blogs, or podcasts.

Transmedia Music Journalism

Music reporting and journalism are, by definition, transmedia. Listening to the music of a local musician who I recently read an interview from will broaden my impression of that musician.

When writing about music on Ammeter, linking to that music or accompanying an article with a recorded interview is transmedia. I wonder about other ways that I can expand transmedia practice as a electronic music reporter. Below are a list of ideas. Let me know if any stand out to you!

  • Print expertly designed posters concerning electronic music events that Ammeter appreciates and paste them up around town.
  • Print and distribute local electronic music guide-zines that inform readers about Vancouver’s grassroots electronic music organizers.
  • Post emails or “letters to the editor” from readers concerning their experiences with particular venues or events.
  • Post music produced by Ammeter staff after they’ve attending a music production workshop.
  • Hand write and hand out endearing notes to dancers at music events that are “from Ammeter.”

It feels like linking to music and posting podcasts / or interviews are insubstantial in modern journalism. Branching out to new forms of media could only benefit the publication.

Adam

Muslim teen and transit hero discuss SkyTrain safety with Vancouver Mayor

On December 15th, Noor Fadel and Jake Taylor visited city hall to meet with Mayor Robertson to speak about effective ways to increase protection on public transportation.

Noor and Jake retold their story. Noor explained that the attacker approached her with an aggressive tone, loudly threatening and cursing at her. The verbal attacks soon escalated into physical assault.

Upon witnessing the attacker strike Noor, Jake disclosed that he sprang into action fending off the attacker with a shove along with a strong warning to “get the F out of here.”

Only one citizen protected Noor despite the train containing several passengers who passively observed the event unfold.

Noor and Jake stated that none of the passengers present have come forward as witnesses yet. After hearing their story Mayor Robertson suggested the formation of an awareness campaign.

Noor and Jake agreed on the importance of education about preventing assaults by taking action. They stressed the need for protecting the victim in several ways.

The two explained that passengers should take advantage of SkyTrain safety methods by pressing the yellow strip, or pushing the speaker button to speak to security.

They recommended on lookers call the police and film the incident to provide evidence. The pair then proposed installing CCTV’s in the trains to quell the voices that claim an incident as false because of insufficient evidence.

Mayor Robertson proposed the idea of the pair creating a documentary about the incident to shed light on preventing a bystander effect. Noor and Jake responded positively to the suggestion stating that speaking out about their story may better inform the public to take a stand together and help keep the community safe.

Click on the audio link below to listen to an interview with Noor Fadel: